One of the best parts of growing a photography business is getting to know and play with all the amazing photo tech floating around out there. When I chose a camera, I played it a little safe and chose a Canon 60D – for the performance, the quality, and the familiarity. My bank account also loved picking it up right as the 70D came into stores!

But the more work I did with the camera, the more I found myself getting a little grumbly – shadows that didn’t show significantly in the viewfinder during a portrait session suddenly looked harsher on a larger screen. Landscapes that appeared focused on the LCD screen were just a hair too blurry when viewed on my Mac. And Canon isn’t a brand that inherently or easily enables using other devices (smart phones, tablets, etc.) as viewfinders.

Because, of course not.

Most of the ones I COULD find were abominably expensive and were geared more towards videographers. Or... Nikon users. I feel pretty secure in saying that most of the shoots my better half accompanied me on ended with me griping about eye fatigue and fears of blurriness.

Apparently, though, my muttering paid off. Much to my surprise and delight, I found an XSories Weye Feye under the Christmas tree this past holiday season. I was previously unfamiliar with the brand, but my other half had done his research and was confident I’d be happy with a Weye Feye solution – he was right.

Trying out my new Weye Feye on Christmas night -- obviously a little excited!

Trying out my new Weye Feye on Christmas night -- obviously a little excited!

Some background: XSories products like this create their own wifi field, to which you connect your preferred viewing device. Simple, eh? For features, Xtories offers a couple of different solutions. The first is the Weye Feye S, which allows for instant media sharing from your camera to your phone.

On the other hand, I received the Weye Feye XL, with additional features allowing me to not only fully control all aspects of my camera from my smartphone or tablet. It straps to any tripod leg, and the battery life is pretty admirable.

It can’t be too shocking, then, that I love this thing. I’ve done a few test runs around my house – as you can see above – but also took it out to the river for a few self-portraits with the gift-giver, himself.

Time with my honey on the tracks, made possible with live view and a remote trigger in the form of a Weye Feye S.  

Time with my honey on the tracks, made possible with live view and a remote trigger in the form of a Weye Feye S.  

In all honesty, it takes a little getting used to, but is reliable and does its job well. And it’s a blast, as a photographer, to find tech that not only allows me to move away from the camera and still get my shot, but also allows me to be in my own photos. Have you seen my new About page? All those photos were shot by me, of me (and William!) using the Weye Feye.

My only gripe is that, when used outdoors, the range on the wifi signal runs out pretty quickly. Not that I was looking to run a quarter mile from my setup, or anything, but even a few feet away found me staring at my phone screen for a few seconds, waiting for the live feed lag to catch up with life.

Even so, the Weye Feye S has a permanent spot in my camera bag for portraits (oh man, I get to dance around in front of babies and puppies and see the shot I’m getting!), art shots, self-portraits, and anything that’s not just 100% spontaneous.